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C851 - Directories

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its4forscience's version from 2018-02-13 00:58

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The root directory. All files appear in this directory or in subdirectories of it./
Holds system configuration files./etc
Holds important boot files, such as the Linux kernel, the initial RAM disk, and often boot-loader configuration files./boot
Holds program files that are critical for normal operation and that ordinary users may run./bin
Holds program files that are critical for normal operation and that ordinary users seldom run./sbin
Holds libraries—code used by many other programs—that are critical for basic system operation./lib
Holds programs and data that are used in normal system operation but are not critical for a bare-bones boot of the system. This directory is split into subdirectories that mirror parts of the root organization—/usr/bin, /usr/sbin, /usr/lib, and so on./usr
Holds users' home directories. Separating this directory into its own low-level filesystem effectively isolates most user data from the OS, which can be useful if you want to reinstall the OS without losing user data./home
The root user's home directory./root
Holds miscellaneous transient files, such as log files and print spool files. One subdirectory of /var, /var/tmp, deserves special mention. Like /tmp (described next), /var/tmp holds temporary files. These files should not be deleted when the computer reboots./var
Holds temporary files, often including temporary files created by user programs. Such files may theoretically be deleted when the computer reboots, although in practice many distributions don't do this./tmp
The traditional mount point for removable media; sometimes split into subdirectories for each mounted filesystem./mnt
The new mount point for removable media; typically split into subdirectories for each mounted filesystem./media
Holds device files, which provide low-level access to hardware./dev
Holds information about the running system./run
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